Impact on learning: Author’s purpose

Inspired by a colleague’s presentation during the KIST ‘Teach together; learn together’ professional development event, I took a more formal approach to the impact cycle than I have in the past.

First, I copied the raw data from my students’ diagnostic assessments into an Excel spreadsheet. I added a row at the bottom to show the average result of each test item as a percentage, then used conditional formatting to create a visual perspective into the data.

Reading diagnostic data

This allowed me to identify a general area of need: Reading. Then I simply copied and pasted the test items with average results of less than 50% along with the corresponding learning outcome indicated in the test documentation.

Reading diagnostic data analysis

The common weak thread, in my analysis, can be expressed by the verbs ‘describe’ and ‘explain’. Surprisingly, in Bloom’s Taxonomy, these terms are associated with Knowledge and Comprehension, or ‘lower’ order thinking.

Glaring omission

One issue involves the outcomes related to author’s purpose. Put bluntly, there is no such learning outcome in the standards for Grade 4 at KIST. The students are being assessed in a high stakes manner on learning outcomes that the school doesn’t explicitly teach. I, of course, can add standards about author’s purpose to my working documents. Indeed, that is the purpose of this impact intervention. However, it’s clear that teachers’ voices are needed in the development of the school’s assessment and planning documents to ensure that they are relevant and in alignment with one another.

Intervention

My plan for having a measurable impact on student learning is to ensure that they are exposed to the idea of author’s purpose, and explore it in a variety of ways in our guided reading sessions. This can be done by direct mini lessons and reinforced by revisiting the concept whenever we encounter a novel or remarkable example in the texts we explore.

Another approach would be through precising and close reading of a master text. For this, the grade four team selected an abridged version of Swiss Family Robinson to be integrated with our unit of inquiry in April and May. This plan might be our students’ first opportunity to read a novel together. The text uses rich vocabulary and imagery, so I believe there will be many opportunities to analyze and summarize selections, and hypothesize about Mr Wyss’ purpose for various literary choices.

Measuring impact

To avoid over-assessing my students, I will plan to use the end-of-year English Diagnostic Assessment, of the same type as the one at the start of they year, to measure impact. Throughout the school year, I have assessed and gathered data on a wide variety of learning outcomes informally during guided reading sessions, but this will be the only formal assessment of the learning outcome of author’s purpose.

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Engagement for organization in writing


The challenge of teaching young writers without limiting or stifling their Voice and creative enthusiasm is a monumental task. Designing engaging writing activities which integrate multiple modes of learning is another. Fortunately, the two tasks are complementary and any effort spent solving one problem helps with the other.


As my fourth graders spent the first six weeks of the school year exploring the 6+1 Traits of Writing, one engagement worked particularly well for the students learning about Organization.

In collaboration with my grade 4 teaching partner, we selected a few texts organized in well structured paragraphs. Then, each text was separated so that the paragraphs could be rearranged. Students worked in small groups to organize the texts in the way the made sense to them. Then, groups were reorganized so that each could discuss their reasons for organizing the texts in the ways that they had.
The result was an authentic yet structured opportunity to practice text organization without criticizing student writing, which I am extremely reluctant to do with such young writers. Social and kinesthetic learning modalities made the experience engaging and fun. It was also an efficient use of time as the design of the activity itself was quite self explanatory.


GAFE Summit 2016

A few weeks ago, I attended the Edtech Team Summit Featuring Google Apps for Education in Kobe, Japan. It was my second ‘GafeSummit’. The first was in 2013 and was a dramatic turning point in my career as a teacher and my life as a digital citizen.


The one notable difference was that this year, I would be presenting a session on Google Apps for Transparency.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BBbXZe8jSpA/

360º



My first eye opener was Jim Sill’s session, Google Views – Lessons in 360º, in which I was introduced to Cardboard. This is a realist iteration of virtual reality that could be easily integrated into schools. Although I haven’t had other VR experiences, I wonder if Cardboard offers a majority of the sensory experience.

The flow

Overall, I was most inspired by Stephen Taylor’s Formatting the Flow session. As an inquiry teacher, I have always wrestled with the impulse to manage students’ learning. What Stephen showed was how formatted documents can make processes visual and focus students on their learning rather than their presentation and reporting media.

BreakoutEDU

A photo posted by Bart Miller (@botofotos) on Feb 6, 2016 at 8:13pm PST

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My group was beta testing BreakoutEDU with augmented reality and was not able to open the box like some other groups.

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Transparency

Finally, it was time for my presentation, Google Apps for Transparency.

As a form of modeling, I shared a Transparency notes Google Doc with all participants for public note taking and documentation.

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I began with a brief introduction to the concept of transparency as it is viewed in practice in government, business, and education. Then, following a generally ‘less to more’ transparent framework according to the slides embedded below, I shared the tools that I use to make planning, teaching, and assessment in my classroom as transparent as possible.



Included in the demonstrations were my weekly planners. I use a template in Google Sheets that allows me to plan to five minutes of accuracy include relevant details including differentiation. These documents are published as a webpage and the link is shared on our class Moodle site.

Having the plans published via a link allows easy access from any internet connected device. A classroom computer at the front of our classroom is dedicated to our projector, but it also has all of our links saved as bookmarks in the web browser. Throughout the day, students check these links. This increases the amount of time that I can devote to learning by minimizing questions like ‘what are we doing next?’ or ‘what’s after lunch?’.

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1v7jufrMw8HRPBCEA6CfuhsDhZKSbkts7IKBNN6cYOhc/pubhtml
Click image to view as webpage.


A teacher in the workshop asked if there was added stress from publishing all of my planning. I replied with that this level of transparency adds a component of accountability that is its own reward.

Using the publishing capability of Google Apps, I also publish slides of our daily warm ups and home learning assignments. They are embedded on our class Moodle and require no additional maintenance. They update automatically when new slides are added. If a parent or other member of our learning community uses them even once to have a conversation with their child or keep up to date on home learning, it’s worth the minimal effort to set up.


Finally, I shared my data workbook. This is a system of spreadsheets that provides me with real time data from assessments and then publishes the same data to individual pages, published as websites, for students and families.


This works extremely well for parents to keep up to date on their child’s learning and for sharing web addresses, usernames, and passwords.

All materials for the workshop are shared in a public Google Drive folder, Transparency | GAFE Summit Kobe 2016.

Strangely, as soon as my session ended, I felt the urge to develop a new data management system that could provide more possibilities for data visualization and analysis. I’ve already begun sketching ideas and look forward to designing and programming this summer.

Reflection

I’ve completed tons of online professional development, and nothing compares to the invigorating social and interactive experience of a face to face conference. Ironically, this can be especially true in technology where digitally isn’t necessarily the best way to learn something new.

The tools which I have put to work immediately are Quizizz and SafeShare. Since introducing Quizizz, my students constantly ask when we will be taking the next quiz.

Reflecting on my own presentation, I feel that I probably learned more than my participants! It is easy to feel that the time and energy spent preparing to conduct a conference or workshop session is wasted, but I found the opposite. By deeply analyzing and presenting my approaches to technology in the classroom, I deepened my understanding. Being inspired to expand my strategies was an unexpected surprise!

If you’re curious to explore the conference, follow this link to view the full schedule.

I’ve already been contacted by Google related colleagues about organizing an event in Tokyo, so I look forward to putting some of that inspiration into action.